• English  

     The goal of the English Department is to encourage and enable all students to:

      • read with deeper understanding
      • explore texts at literal, interpretive, and critical levels
      • expand their repertoire of writing styles and genres
      • write with increased insight, evidence, and clarity
      • incorporate evidence to support their opinions and arguments
      • increase their vocabulary
      • overcome their errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation through individualized correction
      • become clearer, more articulate, and more confident oral communicators
      • develop more sensitive listening skills
      • become media literate students and citizens
      • reflect on their development as thinkers, readers, writers, speakers, and listeners in order to better understand their own strengths and areas for growth
      • become more organized, more diligent, more responsible, and more reflective as students and as citizens

    To be successful in an increasingly global community, students need to enhance their communication skills – written, oral, group, interpersonal, and multimedia communication. New technology is not diminishing but increasing the role of literacies in the 21st century. The ability to speak and write clearly and persuasively, to know one’s audience and purpose, to be sensitive to cultural and disciplinary contexts, to listen carefully, and to engage in articulate, deep discussions are essential skills for the 21st century. 

    English courses are offered with the intent of not only challenging the intellectually curious but also providing a good background of understanding for all. English classes maintain a balance between the content of the discipline – literature and rhetoric – and the skills of language arts – reading, writing, speaking, and listening – that are important across all content areas. 

    Writing instruction focuses on intermediate writing skills, general writing knowledge and procedures, such as the writing process, and more interdisciplinary forms and genres of writing. Students are expected to gain mastery of more complex genres as they move through school, including expressive or creative writing, expository genres, argument, and interpretive writing. 

    All students must pass English 9, 10, 11 and 12 to fulfill the English requirements for graduation.        
     

    COURSE PROGRESSION

    GRADE 9

    GRADE 10

    GRADE 11

    GRADE 12

    Literature and
    the Individual

    Literature and the Community

    American Literature

    Course Options

    Required

    Required

    Required

    Required

     

    All students may take English courses at the College-prep level. In order to be prepared for college-level reading and writing, students taking the courses at the College-prep level should expect to read a diverse selection of texts and write in a variety of genres in class and for homework. All students in College-prep classes will be working on critical reading and analytical writing skills, digital literacy and research skills, vocabulary development, and public speaking skills.

    Students taking the courses at the Honors level will be expected to demonstrate abstract thinking skills, critical reading awareness, excellent research and writing skills, self-directed study skills, and high intellectual vigor and enthusiasm. Students should expect to independently read and critically analyze a significant quantity of sophisticated literature and supplemental readings and engage in critical analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in increasingly abstract response genres in their writing. 
  • Program of Studies

    • 1.
      • English
      • Literature and the Individual
      • 0121
      • Revolving around the essential question “Who am I and how do I know?” students are introduced to interpreting literature, and writing of all forms. Students read a selection of classic literature, as well as a selection of more modern texts. Students write primarily interpretive essays based on the literature they read, as well as some reflective, personal writing. Students will have nightly homework, usually reading, and will analyze the literature through various forms of expression.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 9
      • CP
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2
    • 2.
      • English
      • Literature and the Individual
      • 0131
      • Revolving around the essential question “Who am I and how do I know?” students read a selection of classic literature, as well as a selection of more modern texts. Students write interpretive essays based on the literature, as well as reflective writing. Honors contains more difficult readings, rigorous writing, and more onus on the student. Students should be able to write an organized, analytical piece stating a thesis and using evidence; students are able to go beyond a basic plot summary.
      • Teacher recommendation required.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 9
      • H
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2
    • 3.
      • English
      • Foundations in English 12
      • 0410
      • This course is for seniors pursuing an alternate track who need to develop critical thinking, reading (and response-to-reading), writing, speaking and listening skills with real-life applications. This course is more individualized to identify and build on students’ unique strengths and to meet specific student needs, interests and goals. Foundations will revolve around more goal-setting, current events and non-fiction reading and writing, in comparison to other traditional 12th grade offerings.
      • Requires teacher recommendation
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2
    • 4.
      • English
      • Perspectives on Literature and the Individual
      • 0512
      • Revolving around the essential question “Who am I and how do I know?” students are introduced to interpreting literature and writing of all forms. Students read a selection of literature, and will write primarily interpretive essays, as well as some reflective, personal writing. Students will be guided through each step of the writing process while physically in class. This is a dual English and Special Ed. course - it is modified extensively to meet the needs of individual students.
      • Teacher recommendation required
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 9
      • Language-based disabilities
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2
    • 5.
      • English
      • Perspectives on American Literature
      • 0515
      • This course focuses on a survey of selected major American writers ranging from the colonial era to modern day. We examine the question, “What is American about American literature?” This class blends literary and composition skills based on the literature and supplemental materials covered. This is a dual English and Special Ed. course - it is modified extensively to meet the needs of individual students.
      • Teacher recommendation required
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11
      • Language-based disabilities
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2
    • 6.
      • English
      • Literature and the Community
      • 0221
      • Revolving around the essential question “How do individuals establish a positive relationship with their community?" Grade 10 English blends literary & composition skills, with most of the writing being an analysis of the literature covered. Students read a selection of literature of various styles & time periods, as well as poems, short stories, & essays. Students write creative and/or analytical essays for each major work or genre, as well as focus on verbal skills such as discussion & debate.
      • Successful completion of English 9 is a prerequisite for admission to the tenth grade program
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10
      • CP
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2
    • 7.
      • English
      • Literature and the Community
      • 0231
      • Revolving around the essential question “How do individuals establish a positive relationship with their community?” Grade 10 blends literary and composition skills, with most of the writing being an analysis of the literature covered. Students read a selection of literature of various styles and time periods, as well as poems, short stories, and essays. Honors contains more difficult readings, rigorous writing, required oral participation and activities, and more onus on the student.
      • Successful completion of English 9 is a prerequisite for admission to the tenth grade program. Teacher recommendation required.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10
      • H
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2
    • 8.
      • English
      • Perspectives on Literature and the Community
      • 0513
      • Revolving around the essential question “How do individuals establish a positive relationship with the community?" This course blends literary & composition skills based on the literature covered. Students read a selection of works of various styles & time periods, & will be guided through the writing process in class. This is a dual English and Special Ed. course - it is modified extensively to meet the needs of individual students.
      • Teacher recommendation required
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10
      • Language-based disabilities
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 9.
      • English
      • American Literature
      • 0321
      • This course focuses on a survey of selected major American writers ranging from the Modern era to today. Aligning with 11th grade social studies, we examine the question, "What is American about American literature?" Students read full-length texts by authors such as Fitzgerald, Miller, O’Brien, and Ward, supplemented by various short stories, poems, and essays. A critical paper is written in conjunction with the reading of most major works and/or units covered.
      • Successful completion of English 10 is a prerequisite for admission to the eleventh grade program.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11
      • CP
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 10.
      • English
      • American Literature
      • 0331
      • This course focuses on a survey of selected major American writers ranging from the Modern era to today. Aligning with 11th grade social studies, we examine the question, "What is American about American literature?" Students read full-length texts by authors such as Fitzgerald, Miller, O’Brien & Ward, supplemented by short stories, poems, & essays. A critical paper is written in conjunction with the reading of major works & units covered. Honors level requires additional readings & assignments
      • Successful completion of English 10 is a prerequisite for admission to the eleventh grade program. Teacher recommendation required.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11
      • H
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 11.
      • English
      • AP English:Language and Composition (AP)
      • 0541
      • This junior course cultivates the reading and writing skills that students need for college success and civic engagement. The course places a particular emphasis on persuasive argument, considering questions of tone, purpose, and audience across diverse genres of literature, including nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, and diverse modes of expression, including print, speech, and image. Students enrolled in this course will prepare to take the AP Language and Composition examination.
      • Teacher recommendation required
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11
      • AP
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 12.
      • English
      • American Studies: Voices of Protest and Progress (CP)
      • 2312
      • This interdisciplinary English & American History class will examine the question, What does it mean to be an American? Students explore American themes in literature, history, art, music and philosophy. Students will demonstrate their understanding through critical thinking, source analysis, historical research, technology integrated projects and civil discourse. The course is a team taught, double period class, which fulfills course requirements in junior year English & American History II.
      • Successful completion of English 10 is a prerequisite for admission to the eleventh grade program.
      • Full Year - 10 Credits
      • 11
      • CP
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, S1, S2, C2
    • 13.
      • English
      • American Studies: Voices of Protest and Progress (H)
      • 2332
      • This interdisciplinary English & American History class will examine the question, What does it mean to be an American? Students explore American themes in literature, history, art, music and philosophy. Students will demonstrate their understanding through critical thinking, source analysis, historical research, technology integrated projects and civil discourse. The course is a team taught, double period class, which fulfills course requirements in junior year English & American History II.
      • Successful completion of English 10 is a prerequisite for admission to the eleventh grade program. Teacher recommendation required.
      • Full Year - 10 Credits
      • 11
      • H
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, S1, S2, C2
    • 14.
      • English
      • Global Literature
      • 0180
      • The aim of the course is to enlarge student understanding of the varieties of human experience by attending to stories about people from cultures different from our own. While students will be asked to read carefully and to write about the literature in the traditional analytical manner, the underlying task will be for students to imagine living according to a different set of “rules” or cultural assumptions. Students will write at least one formal analytical essay each quarter.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • CP
      • CCC, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 15.
      • English
      • Global Literature
      • 0184
      • The aim of the course is to enlarge student understanding of the varieties of human experience by attending to stories about people from cultures different from our own. While students will be asked to read carefully and to write about the literature in the traditional analytical manner, the underlying task will be for students to imagine living according to a different set of “rules” or cultural assumptions. Honors level requires additional readings and assignments.
      • Teacher recommendation required.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • H
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 16.
      • English
      • The Graphic Novel
      • 0185
      • We examine the pioneers of the genre of graphic novel, trace the development of theme, analyze aspects of gender, race, sexuality, justice, heroism, and life of the postmodern teenager, as well as analyze contemporary film adaptations. We analyze the combination of artistic imagery and narrative technique and learn how to construct comics by creating our own. We will continue to develop writing skills with a focus on voice and audience. Honors level requires additional readings and assignments.
      • Teacher recommendation required.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • H
      • 18-19 and beyond
      • A1, A2, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 17.
      • English
      • AP English: Literature and Composition
      • 0441
      • This course is for seniors who are ready for the reading and writing skills taught in introductory college courses and who would like to take more advanced English courses when they arrive at college. In this course, the teacher is often discussion leader, questioner and critic, guiding students to assume some of the responsibility for their own learning. The close study of a small number of works in class will be coordinated with the variety offered in the students' outside reading.
      • Teacher recommendation required
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • AP
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 18.
      • English
      • Poetry
      • 0183
      • Students in this senior course will approach poetry as both readers & writers. We will study poetry by authors ranging from Shakespeare to Rupi Kaur in order to glean poetic techniques to apply in our own poetry. Each quarter students will write at least one formal analytical essay about poetry & create a portfolio of revised student poetry. No prior expertise in the writing of poetry is required but a curiosity about poetry is essential. Grades will equally reflect creative & analytical writing
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • CP
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 19.
      • English
      • Poetry
      • 0187
      • Students in this senior course will approach poetry as both readers & writers. We will study poetry by authors ranging from Shakespeare to Rupi Kaur in order to glean poetic techniques to apply in our own poetry. Each quarter students will write at least one formal analytical essay about poetry & create a portfolio of revised student poetry. No prior expertise in the writing of poetry is required but a curiosity about poetry is essential. Grades will equally reflect creative & analytical writing
      • Honors level requires additional assignments. Teacher recommendation required.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • H
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 20.
      • English
      • The Gothic Tradition in Literature and Film
      • 0182
      • This course will trace both the British and American versions of gothic literature in order to explore questions about the supernatural, the psychology of horror and terror, the significance of fantasy and fear, the desire for moral closure and the rules governing gender, race, class, and sexuality. Students will explore a variety of genres: novels, plays, short stories, poetry, and film. Students will write at least one formal analytical essay each quarter.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • CP
      • Global
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 21.
      • English
      • The Graphic Novel
      • 0181
      • Students will explore and discuss the comics medium through graphic novels. We examine the pioneers of the genre, trace the development of theme, analyze aspects of gender, race, sexuality, justice, heroism, and life of the postmodern teenager, as well as analyze contemporary film adaptations. We analyze the combination of artistic imagery and narrative technique and learn how to construct comics by creating our own. We will continue to develop writing skills with a focus on voice and audience.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • CP
      • 18-19 and beyond
      • A1, A2, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 22.
      • English
      • The Gothic Tradition in Literature and Film
      • 0186
      • This course will trace both the British and American versions of gothic literature in order to explore questions about the supernatural, the psychology of horror and terror, the significance of fantasy and fear, the desire for moral closure and the rules governing gender, race, class, and sexuality. Students will explore a variety of genres: novels, plays, short stories, poetry, and film. Students will write at least one formal analytical essay each quarter.
      • Teacher recommendation required. Honors level requires additional assignments
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • H
      • Global
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A4, S1, S2, C1
    • 23.
      • English
      • Creative Writing
      • 0461
      • This is for students who have a passion for writing and who want to experiment with different types of writing. Throughout the semester students will continually work on and eventually submit a polished final draft of a short story. Students may submit at least one piece of writing to the Scholastic Writing Contest and/or the school's literary magazine.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 9,10,11,12
      • CP
      • Media & Communication, Visual & Performing Arts
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2
    • 24.
      • English
      • Creative Writing
      • 0462
      • This is for students who have a passion for writing and who want to experiment with different types of writing. Throughout the semester students will continually work on and eventually submit a polished final draft of a short story. Students should submit at least one piece of writing to the Scholastic Writing Contest and/or the school's literary magazine. Students who take this for Honors credit will produce additional projects.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 9,10,11,12
      • H
      • Media & Communication, Visual & Performing Arts
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2
    • 25.
      • English
      • Acting Shakespeare (CP)
      • 0523
      • From the perspective of the actor, students will study a variety of plays, including tragedies, comedies, and romances, and will connect the themes to the events of today & their own lives. There will be an emphasis on close reading, acting exercises, vocal work, critique, & universal themes. Students will perform scenes & monologues, and demonstrate their learning through various writing activities. Additionally, students will critically view live performances, and/or film adaptations of plays.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 9,10,11,12
      • CP
      • Media & Communication, Visual & Performing Arts
      • TBD
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2