• Social Studies

    The Social Studies Department has developed a sequence of courses, the intent of which is to prepare students for their responsibilities as citizens of the world.  Our programs in the high school build on the middle school coursework, giving students an understanding of modern world and American histories. Students will develop the skills of critical and creative thinking as a means to analyze the problems faced by America in the world community. Three years of social studies are REQUIRED for graduation. Students must complete one year of World History and two years of American History.  Students MUST take United States History during grade 10 and Modern U.S. and World History during grade 11. Students that do not pass United States History must attend summer school in order to complete the history sequence in preparation for graduation.

    In addition to the required courses, Social Studies electives are offered to students in Grades 9 through 12. Students in grade 9 must enroll in World History.  Students who do not pass World History or who transfer from another school and have not completed World History will be expected to fulfill this requirement by enrolling in two semesters of approved World History electives during senior year. This modification of the sequence of courses may only be done with Department Head approval.  Those students’ elective choices must also be approved by the Department Head.  Placement at a particular level requires written approval of the student's current Social Studies teacher or the Department Head. For students pursuing the global competency diploma, classes designated with a small globe next to the course description constitute a course that fulfills a global competency requirement.
     
     
    COURSE PROGRESSION
     
    COLLEGE PREP LEVEL

    GRADE  9

    GRADE 10

    GRADE 11

    GRADE 12

    World History

     

    United States History

    American Studies

    ~or~

    Modern U.S. & World History

    Electives

     
    HONORS LEVEL

    GRADE  9

    GRADE 10

    GRADE 11

    GRADE 12

    World History

     

    United States History

    American Studies

    ~or~

    Modern U.S. & World History

    ~or~

    A.P. U.S. History

    Electives


    Electives may be taken in addition to the required courses at all grade levels.
     
  • Program of Studies

    • 1.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • World History (1450-1919)
      • 2120
      • In World History, students will thematically explore major world developments and cultures from the Renaissance to World War One. A goal of this course will be the use of various problem-solving and critical-thinking strategies to solve historical problems. Students will be required to assume the active role as a participant in history engaged individually and cooperatively in active learning. Emphasis will be placed on multiculturalism, current events, and the world's relevance to our lives.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 9
      • CP
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 2.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • World History (1450-1919)
      • 2130
      • In World History, students will thematically explore major world developments and cultures from the Renaissance to World War One. A goal of this course will be the use of various problem-solving and critical-thinking strategies to solve historical problems. Students will be required to assume the active role as a participant in history engaged individually and cooperatively in active learning. Emphasis will be placed on multiculturalism, current events, and the world's relevance to our lives.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 9
      • H
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 3.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Perspectives in World History
      • 2511
      • This course focuses on world historical issues from 1800 to the present. Students will actively analyze the events that have shaped our present world, such as world war, depression, totalitarianism, decolonization, and economic interdependence. This is a co-taught class with a Special Education teacher and a Social Studies content based teacher; it is modified extensively to meet the needs of individual students. The class is tailored for students with language based learning disabilities.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 9
      • CP
      • All years
    • 4.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • United States History (1800-1919)
      • 2220
      • This course builds upon the foundations of American democracy, presenting students with a sequential development of the settlement, growth, and expansion of the territory now known as the United States from the Early National period (1800) through the early twentieth century. Students will explore fundamental concepts of American government, such as republicanism, federalism, separation of powers, and checks and balances, which endure despite political, economic, and social challenges.
      • Major topics of study include the rise of the two-party system, westward expansion, the Civil War, Reconstruction, industrialization, immigration, and the Progressive Era.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10
      • CP
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 5.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • United States History (1800-1919)
      • 2230
      • This course builds upon the foundations of American democracy, presenting students with a sequential development of the settlement, growth, and expansion of the territory now known as the United States from the Early National period (1800) through the early twentieth century. Students will explore fundamental concepts of American government, such as republicanism, federalism, separation of powers, and checks and balances, which endure despite political, economic, and social challenges.
      • Major topics of study include the rise of the two-party system, westward expansion, the Civil War, Reconstruction, industrialization, immigration, and the Progressive Era.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10
      • H
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 6.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Perspectives in US History I
      • 2510
      • This course examines the historical and intellectual origins of the United States during the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras, exploring the basic concepts of American democracy and government, such as popular sovereignty, federalism, separation of powers, and individual rights. Students learn about westward expansion, the establishment of political parties, and the growth of sectional conflict. The class is tailored for students with language based learning disabilities.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10
      • CP
      • Visual & Performing Arts
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 7.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Modern United States and World History (1919-present)
      • 2320
      • This course will be a thematic exploration of major world developments beginning in the 1920s and leading up to 9/11. Students will explore the political, economic and social issues through the use of various problem-solving and critical-thinking strategies and apply them to historical problems. This course will develop a foundation for students to become active, responsible participants in our diverse and interdependent world.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11
      • CP
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 8.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • American Studies: Voices of Protest and Progress (CP)
      • 2312
      • This interdisciplinary English & American History class will examine the question, What does it mean to be an American? Students explore American themes in literature, history, art, music and philosophy. Students will demonstrate their understanding through critical thinking, source analysis, historical research, technology integrated projects and civil discourse. The course is a team taught, double period class, which fulfills course requirements in junior year English & American History II.
      • Full Year - 10 Credits
      • 11
      • CP
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, S1, S2, C2
    • 9.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Modern United States and World History (1919-present)
      • 2330
      • This course will be a thematic exploration of major world developments beginning in the 1920s and leading up to 9/11. Students will explore the political, economic and social issues through the use of various problem-solving and critical-thinking strategies and apply them to historical problems. This course will develop a foundation for students to become active, responsible participants in our diverse and interdependent world.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11
      • H
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 10.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • American Studies: Voices of Protest and Progress (H)
      • 2332
      • This interdisciplinary English & American History class will examine the question, What does it mean to be an American? Students explore American themes in literature, history, art, music and philosophy. Students will demonstrate their understanding through critical thinking, source analysis, historical research, technology integrated projects and civil discourse. The course is a team taught, double period class, which fulfills course requirements in junior year English & American History II.
      • Reqiuires Teacher Recomendation
      • Full Year - 10 Credits
      • 11
      • H
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 11.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Perspectives in US History II
      • 2512
      • This course examines the emergence of America as an industrial, economic, and world political power and the influence of that growth on American culture. Significant emphasis will be placed on America in the post World War era. This is a co-taught class with a Special Education teacher and a Social Studies content based teacher; it is modified extensively to meet the needs of individual students. The class is tailored for students with language based learning disabilities.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11
      • CP
      • Visual & Performing Arts
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 12.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • AP United States History
      • 2441
      • This college --- level course involves a chronological, in --- depth study of American History from 1492 to the present. The course requires solid essay writing skills, note taking, numerous readings, critical thinking tasks, independent research, and classroom discussion. The program is designed to challenge the student academically and to facilitate transition from the secondary school to college. The expectations and grading will reflect the rigor of an A.P. program.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • AP
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 13.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • AP European History
      • 2443
      • This college --- level course requires students to possess solid essay writing, document analysis, critical thinking, and discussion skills. The student must be a responsible student willing to undertake independent research. The program will assist students in the transition to college. In addition to providing a basic exposure to the factual narrative, the goals are to develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European History (1450 to present).
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • AP
      • CCC, Global
      • 20-21
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 14.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • AP United States Government and Politics
      • 2543
      • This college --- level course introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning, assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence --- based arguments.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • AP
      • CCC, Global, Media & Communications
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 15.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • AP Human Geography
      • 2741
      • This course will deal with the major themes of geography as described by the National Geographic Association. Students will be exposed to issues of place, political, social and economic geography. They will also be introduced to modern technology --- based tools used by the geographer. A major emphasis in the course will be in solving current and historical problems affected by human interaction with the earth’s surface.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • AP
      • CCC, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 16.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • AP Psychology
      • 2841
      • A.P. Psychology is a college --- level course. It is much more theoretical and scientific than Introduction to Psychology and makes more demands on the student for independent study. This course may be taken in addition to Introduction to Psychology or may be taken on its own. This course has a rigorous academic curriculum. It is highly recommended that students wishing to major in Behavioral or Social Sciences take the Statistics Honors course offered by the Math Department.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • AP
      • CCC, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 17.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Gender Studies
      • 2010
      • Students will explore the role that gender plays in society and our everyday lives. We will analyze and discuss gender as an historical, contextual, and intersectional concept that lies at the crossroads of race, class, sexuality, citizenship, age, size, and ability. We will additionally situate gender within contemporary U.S. society—a cross --- cultural and transnational landscape where identities are relational, institutional, and continually shifting social constructs.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • CP
      • CCC,Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 18.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • World Studies/International Relations
      • 2881
      • This course will include an introduction to the key concepts of international relations. A case study approach will be used to analyze current international problems around the world, with an emphasis on current events. The course will involve research work, extensive reading, paper writing, presentations, and debate. Students who have met success in college --- prep level Social Studies courses are encouraged to select this course as a solid foundation for college work.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • CP
      • CCC, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 19.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • World Studies/International Relations
      • 2891
      • This course will include an introduction to the key concepts of international relations. A case study approach will be used to analyze current international problems around the world, with an emphasis on current events. The course will involve research work, extensive reading, paper writing, presentations, and debate. Students who have met success in college --- prep level Social Studies courses are encouraged to select this course as a solid foundation for college work.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • H
      • CCC, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 20.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Early Childhood Education
      • 6321
      • This program provides students with the opportunity to learn the basic concepts regarding child development, to learn to be reflective about interactions with children, to gain a sense of how a child experiences the world, and to acquire skills needed for child care responsibilities in a day care program. Students also have the opportunity to learn about career opportunities in the field of Early Education.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • CP
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 21.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Gender Studies
      • 2015
      • Students will explore the role that gender plays in society and our everyday lives. We will analyze and discuss gender as an historical, contextual, and intersectional concept that lies at the crossroads of race, class, sexuality, citizenship, age, size, and ability. We will additionally situate gender within contemporary U.S. society—a cross --- cultural and transnational landscape where identities are relational, institutional, and continually shifting social constructs.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • H
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 22.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Biopsychology: The Science of Psychological Disorders
      • 3811
      • Biopsychology is a co-taught interdisciplinary laboratory science course that explores the complex relationships between biology and psychology and explains the roles of biological, anatomical, and physiological factors of the human nervous system on neurological and psychological processes. Students will examine the contributions of recent scientific advancements in an effort to understand the origins underlying certain developmental disorders and common psychological issues.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • H
      • CCC, STEAM
      • 19-20
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 23.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Advanced Placement Art History
      • 7601
      • AP Art History provides an introductory college level course regardless of whether one has had previous experience in studio art or art history. Students will examine major forms of artistic expression, look at works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and will then be asked to articulate what they have seen or experienced in those works. The course structure meets the guidelines established by The College Board and is jointly offered by the Art and Social Studies Departments.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • AP
      • CCC, Global, Visual & Performing Arts
      • 19-20
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 24.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Digital Society
      • 2228
      • Students today are living in an age of constant digital connectivity. Digital technology has completely transformed our societal norms and given us new lenses through which we see ourselves and the world. In this course, students will trace the history and development of digital technology, evaluate the rules for conduct and communication in the 21st century, and explore the psychological and sociological implications of our new digital culture.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • CP
      • CCC, Global, Media & Communication
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 25.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Digital Society
      • 2237
      • Students today are living in an age of constant digital connectivity. Digital technology has completely transformed our societal norms and given us new lenses through which we see ourselves and the world. In this course, students will trace the history and development of digital technology, evaluate the rules for conduct and communication in the 21st century, and explore the psychological and sociological implications of our new digital culture.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • H
      • CCC, Global, Media & Communication
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2