• Civics, Citizenship, and Communities Pathway

    The Civics, Citizenship, and Communities Pathway is dedicated to preparing students to be engaged citizens who understand the rights and responsibilities of individuals in their community at the local, state, national, and international level. Within the Pathway, students will enroll in courses grounded in the humanities and social sciences that challenge them to investigate, analyze, evaluate, and deepen their understanding of history, civics, geography, and economics.

    The CCC Pathway aims to nurture the intellectual and social development of students through an emphasis on civic engagement, service learning, and activism. Students who select this pathway should possess the following skills at graduation:

    • enhanced critical thinking, literacy, research, and technological skills;
    • strengthened awareness of local, national, and global issues and cultural diversity;
    • solid understanding of the complexity of social action and reaction;
    • increased recognition of the consequences of individual choice in society; and 
    • the ability to apply coursework to real life experiences in the community.

    Students will complete coursework in each of the following concentrations: Law & Public Policy, Human Development & Behavior, Global History & International Relations.

    Students who graduate with a Civics, Citizenship, and Communities Pathway designation will be suitably equipped to pursue academic and professional goals in the fields of public policy, law, government, education, economics, international relations, social services, and community advocacy.

    CCC Pathway Requirements

    In order to complete the Civics, Citizenship, and Communities Pathway, students must accumulate a minimum of 25 points as described below:   

    • A minimum of 2.5 points from Law & Public Policy related courses* (1 credit = 1 point)
    • A minimum of 2.5 points from Human Development & Behavior related courses* (1 credit = 1 point)
    • A minimum of 2.5 points from Global History & International Relations related courses* (1 credit = 1 point)
    • A maximum of 5 points from CCC-related extra curricular activities. Each year's participation earns 1 point.
    • Internship or other capstone project is required to complete the pathway and will earn 2.5 points.

    * Courses that apply to more than one concentration can only be used to fulfill one concentration requirement.

    Course & Extracurricular Options

    LAW & PUBLIC POLICY

    HUMAN DEVELOPMENT & BEHAVIOR

    GLOBAL HISTORY & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

    American Studies

    Applied Statistics

    Bioethics

    Business & Personal Law

    Business & Personal Law II

    Business Management

    Digital Society

    Economics

    Gender Studies

    Global Economy

    Prometheus Unleashed

    Statistics (AP)

    The 1960s

    U.S. Government & Politics (AP)

    U.S. History (AP)

    World Studies 

    Biology (AP)

    Biopsychology

    Digital Society

    Early Childhood Education

    Experiencing Psychology

    Gender Studies

    Human Geography (AP)

    Introduction to Psychology

    Introduction to Sociology

    Psychology (AP)

    World Religions

     

     

    American Studies

    Ancient Civilizations

    Art History (AP)

    European History (AP)

    Global Economy

    Global Literature

    Human Geography (AP)

    Introduction to Geography

    Stories of World War II

    World Religions

    World Studies

     

     

    EXTRACURRICULAR OPTIONS

    Environmental Club

    GIV Club

    GSA Club

    Habitat for Humanity

    Model UN

    Peer Leaders

    Student Council

    Student Government Day designee or alternate

     


    The courses listed below qualify to earn points toward completion of the CCC Pathway.

     
     

Courses

  • Program of Studies

    • 1.
      • Science, Technology, & Engineering
      • Bioethics (CP)
      • 3031
      • This semester elective focuses on ethical dilemmas resulting from emerging scientific knowledge and applications. Students examine current issues such as scientific experimentation, genetic engineering, cloning, stem cell research, gene therapy, reproductive technology and pollution. Students participate in discussions/debates, present projects and write position papers. Students must maintain a journal and read primary source materials.
      • Successful completion of a full year of Biology. This course is also offered at the honors level.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • CP
      • CCC, Global, STEAM
      • 20-21, 22-23
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 2.
      • Science, Technology, & Engineering
      • Bioethics (H)
      • 3041
      • This semester elective focuses on ethical dilemmas resulting from emerging scientific knowledge and applications. Students examine current issues such as scientific experimentation, genetic engineering, cloning, stem cell research, gene therapy, reproductive technology and pollution. Students participate in discussions/debates, present projects and write position papers. Students must maintain a journal and read primary source materials.
      • A minimum grade of B- in Biology.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • H
      • CCC, Global, STEAM
      • 20-21, 22-23
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 3.
      • Business & Computer Science
      • Global Economy & International Business
      • 5421
      • This course examines the impact that global cultures and government has on international business from the United States’ point of view. The expansion of United States’ businesses to foreign markets will be analyzed along with the barriers to importing and exporting products abroad. International cultures will be examined as they relate to international marketing and the need for American products to adapt if they wish to be successful.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • CP
      • CCC, Computer Science, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2, C3
    • 4.
      • Business & Computer Science
      • Global Economy & International Business
      • 5441
      • This course examines the impact that global cultures and government has on international business from the United States; point of view. The expansion of United States businesses to foreign markets will be analyzed along with the barriers to importing and exporting products abroad. International cultures will be examined as they relate to international marketing and the need for American products to adapt if they wish to be successful.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • H
      • CCC, Computer Science, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2, C3
    • 5.
      • Business & Computer Science
      • Business & Personal Law
      • 5621
      • Business Law is a semester course that introduces the basic principles of business and personal law to students. In this course, students will gain an understanding of the legal principles that will be used throughout the rest of their life, either personally or in the business world. Students will develop a critical eye for the legal process in analyzing facts and making an impartial decision. Topics will include the US legal system and Mass State Court System.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • CP
      • CCC, Computer Science
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C3
    • 6.
      • Business & Computer Science
      • Business Management - Sport & Entertainment Marketing
      • 5622
      • The purpose of this course is to present the student with a solid foundation about what business is, how it operates, and how it is managed. Specific topics include the characteristics of business, forms of ownership, management functions, and production and marketing management. Using virtual simulations, students will learn about sport and entertainment marketing and management. High performing students will have secured internships with local businesses through instructor recommendation.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • CP
      • CCC, Computer Science
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C3
    • 7.
      • Business & Computer Science
      • Business & Personal Law
      • 5623
      • Business Law is a semester course that introduces the basic principles of business and personal law to students. In this course, students will gain an understanding of the legal principles that will be used throughout the rest of their life, either personally or in the business world. Students will develop a critical eye for the legal process in analyzing facts and making an impartial decision. Topics will include the US legal system and Mass State Court System.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • H
      • CCC, Computer Science
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C3
    • 8.
      • Business & Computer Science
      • Business & Personal Law II
      • 5624
      • Business and Personal Law II can be a sequential course to Business and Personal Law 1. This course covers relevant topics in civil and criminal law as it relates to contract and consumer law. Students will develop a critical eye for the legal contractual process. There are no prerequisites for this course.
      • Successful completion of Business and Personal Law I
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • CP
      • CCC, Computer Science
      • All years
      • A1,A2,A3,A4,S2,C1,C3
    • 9.
      • Business & Computer Science
      • Business & Personal Law II
      • 5635
      • Business and Personal Law II can be a sequential course to Business and Personal Law 1. This course covers relevant topics in civil and criminal law as it relates to contract and consumer law. Students will develop a critical eye for the legal contractual process. There are no prerequisites for this course.
      • Successful completion of Business and Personal Law I
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • H
      • CCC, Computer Science
      • All years
      • A1,A2,A3,A4,S2,C1,C3
    • 10.
      • English
      • American Studies: Voices of Protest and Progress (CP)
      • 2312
      • This interdisciplinary English & American History class will examine the question, What does it mean to be an American? Students explore American themes in literature, history, art, music and philosophy. Students will demonstrate their understanding through critical thinking, source analysis, historical research, technology integrated projects and civil discourse. The course is a team taught, double period class, which fulfills course requirements in junior year English & American History II.
      • Successful completion of English 10 is a prerequisite for admission to the eleventh grade program.
      • Full Year - 10 Credits
      • 11
      • CP
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, S1, S2, C2
    • 11.
      • English
      • American Studies: Voices of Protest and Progress (H)
      • 2332
      • This interdisciplinary English & American History class will examine the question, What does it mean to be an American? Students explore American themes in literature, history, art, music and philosophy. Students will demonstrate their understanding through critical thinking, source analysis, historical research, technology integrated projects and civil discourse. The course is a team taught, double period class, which fulfills course requirements in junior year English & American History II.
      • Successful completion of English 10 is a prerequisite for admission to the eleventh grade program. Teacher recommendation required.
      • Full Year - 10 Credits
      • 11
      • H
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, S1, S2, C2
    • 12.
      • English
      • Global Literature
      • 0180
      • The aim of the course is to enlarge student understanding of the varieties of human experience by attending to stories about people from cultures different from our own. While students will be asked to read carefully and to write about the literature in the traditional analytical manner, the underlying task will be for students to imagine living according to a different set of “rules” or cultural assumptions. Students will write at least one formal analytical essay each quarter.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • CP
      • CCC, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 13.
      • English
      • Global Literature
      • 0184
      • The aim of the course is to enlarge student understanding of the varieties of human experience by attending to stories about people from cultures different from our own. While students will be asked to read carefully and to write about the literature in the traditional analytical manner, the underlying task will be for students to imagine living according to a different set of “rules” or cultural assumptions. Honors level requires additional readings and assignments.
      • Teacher recommendation required.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 12
      • H
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 14.
      • Science, Technology, & Engineering
      • Biopsychology: The Science of Psychological Disorders
      • 3811
      • Biopsychology is a co-taught interdisciplinary laboratory science course that explores the complex relationships between biology and psychology. It explains the roles of biological, anatomical, and physiological factors of the human nervous system on neurological and psychological processes. Students will examine the contributions of recent scientific advancements in an effort to understand the origins underlying certain developmental disorders and common psychological issues.
      • This course counts towards the lab science requirement for graduation.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • H
      • CCC, STEAM
      • 19-20, 21-22
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 15.
      • Science, Technology, & Engineering
      • Biotechnology (CP)
      • 3423
      • Biotechnology explores technologies at the molecular and cellular level. In this course, students will explore the techniques used in biotechnology and its implications through laboratories, readings and discussions. The course examines applications of biotech that have contributed to industrial processes, agriculture, forensics and medicine as well as its role in managing environmental wastes and pollution. Students will examine potential careers and emerging applications in biotechnology.
      • A minimum grade of B- in Biology. This course is also offered for Honors credit. This course counts towards the lab science requirement for graduation.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • CP
      • Global, STEAM
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 16.
      • Science, Technology, & Engineering
      • Biotechnology (H)
      • 3432
      • Biotechnology explores technologies at the molecular and cellular level. In this course, students will explore the techniques used in biotechnology and its implications through laboratories, readings and discussions. The course examines applications of biotech that have contributed to industrial processes, agriculture, forensics and medicine as well as its role in managing environmental wastes and pollution. Students will examine potential careers and emerging applications in biotechnology.
      • A minimum grade of A- in Biology. This course counts towards the lab science requirement for graduation. This course is also offered for CP credit.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • H
      • Global, STEAM
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 17.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • American Studies: Voices of Protest and Progress (CP)
      • 2312
      • This interdisciplinary English & American History class will examine the question, What does it mean to be an American? Students explore American themes in literature, history, art, music and philosophy. Students will demonstrate their understanding through critical thinking, source analysis, historical research, technology integrated projects and civil discourse. The course is a team taught, double period class, which fulfills course requirements in junior year English & American History II.
      • Full Year - 10 Credits
      • 11
      • CP
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, S1, S2, C2
    • 18.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • American Studies: Voices of Protest and Progress (H)
      • 2332
      • This interdisciplinary English & American History class will examine the question, What does it mean to be an American? Students explore American themes in literature, history, art, music and philosophy. Students will demonstrate their understanding through critical thinking, source analysis, historical research, technology integrated projects and civil discourse. The course is a team taught, double period class, which fulfills course requirements in junior year English & American History II.
      • Reqiuires Teacher Recomendation
      • Full Year - 10 Credits
      • 11
      • H
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 19.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • AP United States History
      • 2441
      • This college --- level course involves a chronological, in --- depth study of American History from 1492 to the present. The course requires solid essay writing skills, note taking, numerous readings, critical thinking tasks, independent research, and classroom discussion. The program is designed to challenge the student academically and to facilitate transition from the secondary school to college. The expectations and grading will reflect the rigor of an A.P. program.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • AP
      • CCC
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 20.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • AP Human Geography
      • 2741
      • This course will deal with the major themes of geography as described by the National Geographic Association. Students will be exposed to issues of place, political, social and economic geography. They will also be introduced to modern technology --- based tools used by the geographer. A major emphasis in the course will be in solving current and historical problems affected by human interaction with the earth’s surface.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • AP
      • CCC, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 21.
      • Art
      • Advanced Placement Art History
      • 7601
      • AP Art History provides an introductory college level course regardless of whether one has had previous experience in studio art or art history. Students will examine major forms of artistic expression, look at works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and will then be asked to articulate what they have seen or experienced in those works. The course structure meets the guidelines established by The College Board and is jointly offered by the Art and Social Studies Departments.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • AP
      • CCC, Global, Visual & Performing Arts
      • 19-20
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 22.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • AP Psychology
      • 2841
      • A.P. Psychology is a college --- level course. It is much more theoretical and scientific than Introduction to Psychology and makes more demands on the student for independent study. This course may be taken in addition to Introduction to Psychology or may be taken on its own. This course has a rigorous academic curriculum. It is highly recommended that students wishing to major in Behavioral or Social Sciences take the Statistics Honors course offered by the Math Department.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • AP
      • CCC, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2
    • 23.
      • Math
      • Introductory Statistics (CP)
      • 1523
      • Topics include: --- Collecting, analyzing and interpreting numerical data in one and two variables--- Representing data in a variety of graph types including: circle, bar line plot & histogram --- Presenting data to an audience and fielding questions from the audience. Throughout the course applying these concepts to mathematical and real world problems is emphasized. Students will also investigate conditional probability and rules of probability so they can use probability to make decisions.
      • Successful completion of an algebra 2 course and teacher recommendation
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11, 12
      • CP
      • Business, CCC, Global, STEAM
      • All years
      • A1, A2, A3, A4, S1, S2
    • 24.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • Gender Studies
      • 2010
      • Students will explore the role that gender plays in society and our everyday lives. We will analyze and discuss gender as an historical, contextual, and intersectional concept that lies at the crossroads of race, class, sexuality, citizenship, age, size, and ability. We will additionally situate gender within contemporary U.S. society—a cross --- cultural and transnational landscape where identities are relational, institutional, and continually shifting social constructs.
      • Semester - 2.5 Credits
      • 10,11,12
      • CP
      • CCC,Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C1, C2
    • 25.
      • Soc. Stud.
      • World Studies/International Relations
      • 2881
      • This course will include an introduction to the key concepts of international relations. A case study approach will be used to analyze current international problems around the world, with an emphasis on current events. The course will involve research work, extensive reading, paper writing, presentations, and debate. Students who have met success in college --- prep level Social Studies courses are encouraged to select this course as a solid foundation for college work.
      • Full Year - 5 Credits
      • 11,12
      • CP
      • CCC, Global
      • All years
      • A1, A3, A4, S1, S2, C2